Fernandinho

Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola’s capacity to analyse the tiniest details is exactly what makes him different from other coaches, based on Fernandinho.

Guardiola has enjoyed unprecedented success as a head coach since taking his initial role in Barcelona in 2008.

The 49-year-old headed the Blaugrana to 3 La Liga names and two European allies, before deciding to have a year’s sabbatical in 2012.

Bayern Munich came phoning 12 months afterward and he managed to bring yet another seven decorations to his remarkable collection while at Germany, such as three consecutive Bundesliga crowns.

The chance to manage from the Premier League with City subsequently introduced itself in 2016, and Guardiola has since enjoyed the very same levels of success in British soccer.

City have won just two Premier League games, 1 FA Cup and three Carabao Cups below the Spaniard’s stewardship, using much more silverware lined up when the 2019-20 effort resumes this summer towards the coronavirus pandemic.

The City celebrity told Sky Sports: “I always say that the gap between him and the other trainers I have had throughout my time in soccer is that he appears at the tiniest details.

“He gives you the info you want about the competition and of course yourself, and he spends a great deal of time studying the place to locate spaces and at which to shut spaces to make difficulties for your opponent.

“That is crucial because the sport we view, as coaches and players, is somewhat different from the people who visit the arena or see the games on TV. These details enable you to enhance, to do better, and to assist the group.

“I have to speak to the men in front of me, to let them keep going. That is just another of the ways he’s helped me through this time. But in addition, the principle of this game stays exactly the same. We love to play the ball and once we do not possess the ball, we attempt to recover it whenever possible.”

Fernandinho has been made to adapt to a different part in the heart of City’s defence before this year after Aymeric Laporte was struck with a long-term accident.

The Brazilian, who’d been a midfielder by trade, admits that he discovered that the transition”odd” at first, but soon got used to his new function in Guardiola’s starting XI.

“I feel that the biggest challenge of going to centre-back for me personally was that, as a midfielder, you’re utilised to running a good deal ahead,” Fernandinho added. “You go to the struggle in the center and you’re able to get rid of the ball or you are able to win the ball.

“However, in centre-back, you have a great deal of room behind us, involving the central defenders and the goalkeeper, and you need to pay attention to this since the majority of the teams that come to perform against us seem to perform with those sorts of chunks behind the back four.

“For me personally, at the beginning, it was a tiny bit odd adapting to this, but later I managed to take action.”